Welcome.

Our mission is to improve quality of life by facilitating evidence-based health behavior change for communities, organizations, and individuals. As experts on health behavior change, we believe passionately in the power of education and awareness – by increasing the knowledge base, skills, and mindfulness of individuals or organizations, we can purposefully and effectively bring about positive change.

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Wellness News

January 2, 2019

The Year of Cessation

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has designated 2019 as the Year of Cessation. Please see the featured article Your Year to Quit Smoking along with attached graphics.

This article:

  • Encourages people who smoke to make 2019 the year they quit for good.
  • Promotes tools and resources to help them if they need it.
  • Shares the story of James, one of CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers® campaign participants.
    • In the video “No, I Won’t Buy You Smokes,” James shares how a conversation with this roommate helped reinforce his decision to be smoke-free.
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September 27, 2018

Motivational Interviewing: Enhancing Healthy Change

Reflect on how you feel when a patient or client does not follow your well-intended, evidence-based, even profound health-promoting recommendations. Do you feel frustrated, angry, impatient? Do you label the person “non-compliant” or “difficult?”

Perhaps what we have here is a failure to communicate. I just completed a course on Advanced Motivational Interviewing (MI) at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. It was hosted by skilled facilitators from the Behavioral Health and Wellness Program and attended by counselors, tobacco cessation specialists, psychologists, health coaches, and physicians. We worked collaboratively in teams to discover how to improve our abilities to communicate, facilitate change, and unlock motivation.

Read the full article here.

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Dimensions

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Awake!

CINDY MORRIS, Psy.D., Clinical Director

With each transition, comes a new opportunity. A chance to do and see things differently. An opportunity to be transformed. Transitions come in all shapes and sizes. Whether it’s ringing in a new year, traveling to a place yet unknown, or arriving home from a day of work, we have the chance to set a new goal or intention for the next segment of our lives, no matter how long or short it may be.

In the spirit of appreciation for the power of transitions, I’d like to set my intention for 2019. My intention is to be more intentional. Let me explain. As we move through our lives, we develop habits—patterns of being, thinking, and doing that ease our movement through the world. These grow out of our learning about what is most efficient or effective, saving us time and energy. Or they are simply automatic responses we’ve repeated many times before. While these habits can bring feelings of comfort and ease, they also bring rigidity and lack of awareness and present a barrier to positive growth and change. We become fixed in a structure with few novel and interesting experiences. While we feel safe as we engage in the familiar and known, there is little room for what we really want, which are novel opportunities—encounters with the potential to spark something new in us. Something to help us to tap into the magic of our everyday experience.

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Spotlight

Registration Open for Upcoming BHWP Trainings

Registration is currently open for several BHWP trainings. The trainings are held at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, CO.

Our 2019 Motivational Interviewing for Behavior Change trainings are scheduled! The Level I training will be held on March 4-5 and the Level II on July 29-30. 

Do you want to improve the quality of your communication with patients? Or support your patients to successfully change their health behaviors? As a healthcare provider, you may feel frustrated when working with patients that seem “resistant” or “non-compliant” when it comes to behavior change. This can even affect your experience of connection, effectiveness, and job satisfaction. If you are interested in improving your patient interactions and increasing your ability to effectively support patients towards health behavior change, Motivational Interviewing (MI) training can help.

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