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Study Finds Your Partner’s Choices in Diet, Exercise, Smoking, etc. Affect Your Own

A study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine finds that “when one partner changed to a healthier behavior (newly healthy), the other partner was more likely to make a positive health behavior change than if their partner remained unhealthy.” The authors, from the University College London, studied data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. The group concluded that “men and women are more likely to make a positive health behavior change if their partner does too. Involving partners in behavior change interventions may therefore help improve outcomes.”

For more on this study, see the publication here or the Washington Post’s article here.

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